Tag Archives: Southern history

A little bit of magic on the page: Magic City Gospel

This is a stunning prayer of a book. Jones writes:

Nothing good in life comes without stirring–

the promise of butter, the salty whirring

of pressure in a pot.

These poems stir the pot of history and memory to create word paintings of great beauty and power. Continue reading

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Why I Think You Should Read Go Set a Watchman, by Harper Lee

Unless you’ve been avoiding all forms of traditional and new media for the past month, there’s no way you could have missed the dramatic hype of Harper Lee’s new novel, the bizarre (and cloudy) circumstances surrounding its publication, and the … Continue reading

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A Shadow Over Us All

On Thursday morning, my Facebook feed filled with expressions of sympathy and support for the people of Emanuel A.M.E. Church. I scrolled through re-postings of news stories and op-eds and individual ruminations that tried to understand the events that had … Continue reading

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Miss Hazel and the Rosa Parks League

        A couple of months ago, my friend Meredith and I attended an author reading by Jonathan O’Dell. O’Dell’s new book, Miss Hazel and the Rosa Parks League, recounts the story of two Mississippi women, one black and one white, … Continue reading

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The Textile Strike of 1934 and Power Struggles in the Small-Town South: Fate Moreland’s Widow

John Lane’s richly textured novel Fate Moreland’s Widow brings the cotton mill world of 1930s South Carolina to life in a tale that is part love story, part courtroom thriller, part family saga. Lane sets the story of Ben Crocker, … Continue reading

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Unconventional Women: Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy

I know a fair bit about the Civil War. After all, I teach a course on the subject every other year.  So when I picked up Karen Abbott’s fascinating Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War … Continue reading

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The Last Sister

    Conflict raged on the South Carolina frontier in the 1760s. Angry about white settlers encroaching on their land and about Virginia settlers’ murder of warriors returning from fighting for the British cause in the French and Indian War, … Continue reading

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Natchez Burning and the Legacy of the Long Civil Rights Movement

Natchez Burning and the Legacy of the Long Civil Rights Movement             In recent years,  UNC-Chapel Hill professor emerita Jacquelyn Dowd Hall and other scholars have turned their attention to the so-called “long civil rights movement”, the period of more … Continue reading

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Selma, the knot of history, and the power of art

Once in a while events conspire to immerse me in consideration of a single historical issue or event.  This week, I’ve been plunged into the deep waters of our nation’s troubled relationship with issues of race.  Last Sunday, I began … Continue reading

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